For decades, General Electric dumped highly toxic chemicals called PCBs into the Hudson River. Those poisons continue to pollute our waters to this day. Now, it is GE’s responsibility to pay for the devastating impacts of their actions.

EXPERT ASSESSMENT

While it is impossible to ever recover all that has been lost, the law is clear: Polluters must pay to help repair the harm they caused.

Scenic Hudson asked leading Natural Resource Damage (NRD) experts to assess the injury to the Hudson caused by GE’s PCBs. The resulting report, An Analysis of Potential Natural Resource Damages Related to Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Discharges into the Hudson River, estimates GE could owe as much as $11.4 billion to restore the river, ecology, and communities along its shores, with up to an additional $10.7 billion for dredging to prevent further harm to natural resources.

WATCH THE BRIEFING

Click here to view a 12-minute video of Hayley Carlock, Director of Environmental Advocacy and Legal Affairs at Scenic Hudson, presenting an overview of the NRD report.

WHAT IS A NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE (NRD) ASSESSMENT?

Federal law requires polluters to clean up contamination and compensate for the resulting damage. In New York, federal and state Natural Resource Trustees conduct a full assessment of the impacted areas, including the extent of the harm, as well as recommendations for restoration actions. The parties responsible for the assessed damages are then liable for the cost of restoration and replacement projects.

ACTION IS NEEDED TO RESTORE THE HUDSON

We must hold GE accountable. A fair NRD settlement will help clean and restore the Hudson River, benefiting all who live along and enjoy this magnificent waterway.

The Hudson River Natural Resource Damage Assessment should provide the people of New York the resources to restore the Hudson to its condition before GE’s PCB contamination by:

  • Implementing restoration projects that foster new recreation and ecotourism opportunities
  • Helping restore the Hudson’s once vibrant fisheries 
  • Ensuring Hudson River fish are safe to consume and end reliance on consumption advisories that do not protect subsistence fishing communities
  • Eliminating threats to drinking water and additional costs to filter PCBs from supplies
  • Healing the river’s environment with substantive natural resource improvements